Dental

Dental health is of utmost importance to your horse’s well-being.

Equine Dental

Dental health is of utmost importance to your horse, pony or donkey’s well-being, whether it is a retired companion or a performance athlete. Our vets are trained to assess your horse’s mouth and provide any treatment that may be necessary. Horses can chew rough fiber for up to 18 hours each day which gradually wears their teeth down. To compensate for this, horses teeth continue to erupt throughout their lifetime until they reach old age when there is nothing left to erupt. All horses should have 36 teeth and some will have more if they develop canine or wolf teeth. There are many different issues that can affect your horses mouth

Commonly dental problems

  • sharp enamel points (sharp edges)
  • overgrowths of teeth sometimes called hooks or points
  • ulceration of the cheeks or tongue
  • fractured or missing teeth
  • diastemata (gaps in between teeth) where food gets trapped
  • periodontal disease, inflammation and pain of the gums and surrounding soft tissue

 

Routine dental examinations allow us to identify and treat any problems associated with horses teeth, gums or tongue to avoid any unnecessary pain or suffering. We recommend that your horses teeth are examined at 6-12 monthly intervals; although 3 months may be recommended for some horses.

To ensure we work within Covid-19 government guidelines and to protect our staff and our clients, we have modified our approach to equine dentistry at Aireworth Vets. All horses receiving dental treatment will now be required to be sedated by the treating vet.

Sedation allows a safe, thorough, and modern approach to equine dentistry. Using a small amount of sedation will help to keep your horse calm and still during the application of the dental speculum (gag) and their dental examination. Sedation negates the need to have you, the owner holding your horse during the procedure and reduces face to face contact with the vet. Once the horse is lightly sedated, clients will be asked to remain outside of the stable whilst the vet treats your horse.

Sedation is very well tolerated by most horses and your vet can adjust the dose to the individual size, age and temperament of your horse. The effects of the sedation are short acting and last from 30 minutes to 1 hour and there is no need to starve your horse prior to sedation.

Sedation reduces the movement of your horse’s head, tongue and cheek muscles allowing better visualisation of the entire mouth, this makes it easier to use dental instrumentation including rasps, picks and mirrors in your horse’s mouth. A quiet, relaxed horse enables a more thorough examination to be completed by the vet to ensure that any problems are identified and treated as soon as possible. Part of the sedation protocol used by our vets will provide mild pain relief. This is vital for those horses experiencing pain from dental disease, ulceration or tooth fractures. As prey animals, horses are excellent at hiding dental pain and so may not be showing obvious signs of discomfort prior to their dental exam.

Our aim at Aireworth vets is to ensure that your horse has a positive experience and pain free dental examination or procedure. Only veterinary surgeons can legally sedate horses. Most equine “dentists” or equine dental technicians cannot provide sedation, anaesthetic or pain relief to horses during dental examinations and so are unable to perform the range of dental treatments available from our vets.

As mentioned previously, horses are good at hiding dental pain, however if you observe any of the following signs, please call the Practice to make an appointment for a dental exam.

Clinical signs of dental disease

  • halitosis (foul smelling breath)
  • dropping food (quidding)
  • difficulty or asymmetry when chewing
  • changes in ridden behavior (head shaking, biting issues etc)
  • facial swelling ● inappetence or selective feeding (won’t eat hay/haylage)
  • weight loss
  • smelly nasal discharge (from one nostril)
  • recurrent colic

 

At Aireworth Vets we offer dental visits whereby routine dental treatments (examination, routine rasping, wolf teeth removal) can be carried out. If 3 or more horses at the same yard are booked on a dental visit, the visit fee will not be charged.

We have modern diagnostic and dental equipment and the necessary skills within our team of vets to treat most dental issues that your horse may have. Should your horse require more advanced treatment, we have an excellent relationship with Rainbow Equine Hospital, Malton North Yorkshire and can arrange referral appointments for your horse.

For further information about equine dentistry at Aireworth Vets please call the office 01535 602988

Equine
Dental

Dental health is of utmost importance to your horse, pony or donkey’s well-being, whether it is a retired companion or a performance athlete. Our vets are trained to assess your horse’s mouth and provide any treatment that may be necessary. Horses can chew rough fiber for up to 18 hours each day which gradually wears their teeth down. To compensate for this, horses teeth continue to erupt throughout their lifetime until they reach old age when there is nothing left to erupt. All horses should have 36 teeth and some will have more if they develop canine or wolf teeth. There are many different issues that can affect your horses mouth

Commonly dental problems

  • sharp enamel points (sharp edges)
  • overgrowths of teeth sometimes called hooks or points
  • ulceration of the cheeks or tongue
  • fractured or missing teeth
  • diastemata (gaps in between teeth) where food gets trapped
  • periodontal disease, inflammation and pain of the gums and surrounding soft tissue

 

Routine dental examinations allow us to identify and treat any problems associated with horses teeth, gums or tongue to avoid any unnecessary pain or suffering. We recommend that your horses teeth are examined at 6-12 monthly intervals; although 3 months may be recommended for some horses.

To ensure we work within Covid-19 government guidelines and to protect our staff and our clients, we have modified our approach to equine dentistry at Aireworth Vets. All horses receiving dental treatment will now be required to be sedated by the treating vet.

Sedation allows a safe, thorough, and modern approach to equine dentistry. Using a small amount of sedation will help to keep your horse calm and still during the application of the dental speculum (gag) and their dental examination. Sedation negates the need to have you, the owner holding your horse during the procedure and reduces face to face contact with the vet. Once the horse is lightly sedated, clients will be asked to remain outside of the stable whilst the vet treats your horse.

Sedation is very well tolerated by most horses and your vet can adjust the dose to the individual size, age and temperament of your horse. The effects of the sedation are short acting and last from 30 minutes to 1 hour and there is no need to starve your horse prior to sedation.

Sedation reduces the movement of your horse’s head, tongue and cheek muscles allowing better visualisation of the entire mouth, this makes it easier to use dental instrumentation including rasps, picks and mirrors in your horse’s mouth. A quiet, relaxed horse enables a more thorough examination to be completed by the vet to ensure that any problems are identified and treated as soon as possible. Part of the sedation protocol used by our vets will provide mild pain relief. This is vital for those horses experiencing pain from dental disease, ulceration or tooth fractures. As prey animals, horses are excellent at hiding dental pain and so may not be showing obvious signs of discomfort prior to their dental exam.

Our aim at Aireworth vets is to ensure that your horse has a positive experience and pain free dental examination or procedure. Only veterinary surgeons can legally sedate horses. Most equine “dentists” or equine dental technicians cannot provide sedation, anaesthetic or pain relief to horses during dental examinations and so are unable to perform the range of dental treatments available from our vets.

As mentioned previously, horses are good at hiding dental pain, however if you observe any of the following signs, please call the Practice to make an appointment for a dental exam.

Clinical signs of dental disease

  • halitosis (foul smelling breath)
  • dropping food (quidding)
  • difficulty or asymmetry when chewing
  • changes in ridden behavior (head shaking, biting issues etc)
  • facial swelling ● inappetence or selective feeding (won’t eat hay/haylage)
  • weight loss
  • smelly nasal discharge (from one nostril)
  • recurrent colic

 

At Aireworth Vets we offer dental visits whereby routine dental treatments (examination, routine rasping, wolf teeth removal) can be carried out. If 3 or more horses at the same yard are booked on a dental visit, the visit fee will not be charged.

We have modern diagnostic and dental equipment and the necessary skills within our team of vets to treat most dental issues that your horse may have. Should your horse require more advanced treatment, we have an excellent relationship with Rainbow Equine Hospital, Malton North Yorkshire and can arrange referral appointments for your horse.

For further information about equine dentistry at Aireworth Vets please call the office 01535 602988